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WORLD MAYOR 2016
• Shortlist 2016
• Longlist 2016
• Code of Ethics
• World Mayor Prize
• World Mayor History

• Raison d'être

TESTIMONIALS
• Mayor of Aleppo
• Mayor of Amstelveen
• Mayor of Athens
• Mayor of Cologne
• Mayor of Gdansk
• Mayor of Grande-Synthe
• Mayor of Hettstedt
• Mayor of Lahr
• Mayor of Lampedusa
• Mayor of Lesbos
• Mayor of Mechelen
• Mayor of Philadelphia
• Mayor of Schwäbisch Gmünd

ESSAYS BY
• Mayor of Aleppo
• Mayor of Amstelveen
• Mayor of Athens
• Mayor of Gdansk
• Mayor of Lahr
• Mayor of Mechelen
• Mayor of Schwäbisch Gmünd



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The winner of the 2016 World Mayor Prize and other results will be announced on 14 February 2017



WORLD MAYOR 2016
The City Mayors Foundation has invited the mayors shortlisted for the 2016 World Mayor Prize to contribute their thoughts on the challenges faced by and opportunities offered to their communities following the arrival of hundreds, if not thousands, of refugees and migrants from war zones and desaster-torn regions of the world. Below Mirjam van ’t Veld, Mayor of Amstelveen, Netherland, writes with humility and thoughtfulness.

Essay by Mirjam van ’t Veld
Mayor of Amstelveen, Netherlands

On 20 October, the shortlist for the 2016 World Mayor Prize was disclosed. I am one of the fifteen nominated mayors.

When earlier this year I learned that I was nominated for this Award, I was immensely surprised. I cannot express in words how honoured I felt. Particularly, since this year the award is related to mayors who devote themselves to the reception of refugees and the integration of recent immigrants into their municipality. The nomination supported me in our efforts in Amstelveen to provide a humane reception for the refugees with due consideration for the surrounding area. I consider it a token of appreciation for all the Dutch municipalities who did the same to the best of their abilities and still continue to do so today.

On the other hand, it made me humble. As a mayor I have taken my responsibilities based on the strong belief that it’s our duty to offer a (temporary) safe haven to people from war zones. I have not done this on my own, but together with the city board, the city council and many Amstelveen residents who share this belief. Does this make me a world mayor, who chips in a penny for a community in which we live together and look after each other?

Since the shortlist has been disclosed, there has been an overwhelming feeling of humbleness in me. Because what deeply touched me was the nomination of the mayor of Aleppo in Syria. Just imagine to be the mayor of a city in ruins, the symbol of unbearable distress and a future with no hope. How am I supposed to compare Amstelveen to Aleppo? How am I supposed to compare my contribution to that of mayors in war zones, areas of pain and misery? This is impossible. That’s why I believe that all those mayors, who bring a ray of hope to their residents under such distressing circumstances, are the true World Mayors.

The nomination by the City Mayors Foundation and the recommendations from the Amstelveen residents, from colleagues and relations, the Home Secretary, the chairman of the Christian Democratic Appeal, the Royal Commissioner of the province of Noord-Holland and the chairman of the Netherlands Municipalities Association incite and inspire me to continue with the promotion of tolerance and respect. I fully support the principles of the Code of Ethics for local government. This is an essential document. However, even a small gesture, especially that one small gesture has value and may just make a difference to someone. I will continue to dedicate myself to a society where everybody will be included and is able to participate.